Carpe diem…

kaiteoreilly

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My formal education was not the best. I didn’t learn any classical languages, but in my informal education I swiftly learnt the translations of many maxims which still hold true to me, today.

Seize the day.

Fortune favours the brave.

My informal education was my true training, and one which I procured for myself. This involved reading anything I found which was in print, from takeaway menus and dodgy advertisements pushed through the door, to sneaking out Gunter Grass’s The Tin Drum from the adult section of a Birmingham library, aged twelve.

This training in understanding how (in particular) plays work came with reading widely – and the same play often. This began in my teens, when I read and re-read Shakespeare’s Hamlet and King Lear – the former a master class in structure and plot which I still use to teach classical Western dramaturgy to…

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  1. #1 by Teepee12 on July 3, 2012 - 17:46

    I’m always amused when people deny that there is no truth is “cliches” or, for that matter, “stereotypes” (by which I do NOT mean racial stereotypes which I classify not as stereotypes but as hate, pure and simple). Certainly nothing so simple as a “saying” or a description of any group of people larger than 1 could possibly contain ALL the truth … nor is anything (including the Truth) entirely true … or, for that matter, ever true for every member of any group … but there’s usually at least a kernel of some kind of truth at the core. One of the really nifty things about living in Israel for me for all those years was that (a) People who didn’t like me were not anti-Semitic. They really didn’t like ME. (b) The burglars who stole my jewelry were Jewish, the cops who tried to catch them (they did, but too late to save my stuff) were Jews … good guys, bad guys, all the people I hung out with …

    Yet, within the larger society of Jews from all over the world, there were still plenty of ethnic stereotypes … and they weren’t generally derogatory, but rather more descriptive of a particular culture and behavior typical of that culture. It was an interesting lesson.

    Truth is so slippery sometimes …

    • #2 by lambskinny on July 3, 2012 - 22:36

      Teepee12,
      What are you talking about?
      Does this relate to Kaite’s post?
      Or to something else?
      Or are you spamming us?
      At any rate…
      Carley

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